Browse Exhibits (6 total)

Designing People

15-006-049.jpg

The figures that inhabit architectural and landscape renderings are not the actual focus of the drawings. Homeowners, children, pets, shoppers, and condo-dwellers are included to convey the scale and functionality of a proposed design. They humanize and create an emotional appeal in what might otherwise appear to be sterile environments and allow the client to imagine how a space will be used. From the watercolor Victorian to the scalie hipster, this exhibit features more than a century of designers’ representations of people from the Environmental Design Archives.

 

, , , ,

Urban Beast or Urbane Beauty

CB panel 1_001.jpg

Planning the City Beautiful

One hundred years ago, Daniel Burnham and Edward Bennett published a vision of Chicago that reflected the early stages of big city planning. The City Beautiful Movement, spurred by Baron Haussmann's remaking of Paris in the 1860s, was intended to create a rational, classical city to replace the crowded, unplanned Victorian city common in the 19th Century. The 1909 Plan for Chicago, although never fully realized, is heralded as the apex of the City Beautiful Movement which found echoes in plans for the San Francisco Civic Center, Oakland's City Center, the Sunol Water Tower Temple, and urban planning from Manila to Canberra, Australia. This exhibit explores the City Beautiful Movement as manifested in the San Francisco Bay Area, and subsequent attempts to make its wide boulevards, Beaux Arts buildings and neo-classical domes welcome to urban inhabitants.

, ,

Environmental Design/A New Modernism

Digital Weave-4.jpg

50th Anniversary of the College of Environmental Design, 1959-2009

The College of Environmental Design (CED) was conceived of in the 1950s and formally established in 1959. To differentiate their ideas from Modernist dogma, the founders William Wurster, Catherine Bauer Wurster, Jack Kent, and their Bay Area colleagues dubbed their vision “Environmental Design,” or what we might call a “New Modernism.” The CED was unique not only because it was one of the earliest colleges to combine architecture, city planning, landscape architecture, and the decorative arts, but also because it emphasized the important role of the social, natural, and physical sciences in informing teaching, practice, and research. Wurster Hall, completed in 1964, has become the emblem of the founders’ vision where, in 2009, it continues to emerge anew.

The exhibit focuses on seminal moments from 1959 to 2009 in the evolution of the CED founders' vision, whereby teaching, research, and practice were informed by the social and natural sciences and which, in recent decades, has significantly come to include the computer sciences. It features images of drawings, photographs, and documents drawn from the Environmental Design Archives, the Environmental Design Library, the Bancroft Library, the University Archives, IURD and CEDR, and private collections.

, , , ,

Off Hours

Image00003.jpg

Environments for Entertainment

As Americans' leisure time has increased during the century, we have filled it with all manner of diversions.  This exhibit highlights the buildings and landscapes in which we seek respite from the stresses of daily life.  Grouped thematically as things to watch, play, eat and buy, the focus is on spaces sucha s theaters, restuarants, playgrounds, country clubs, stores and sports facilities.  Original sketches, photogrpahs, drawings and rare books are included in the material on display provided by the Enviornmental Design Archives, Visual Resources Center, and Environmental Design Library.

, ,

Julia Morgan: Hidden Engineer

St Johns pews copy.jpg

The Designs of Julia Morgan

Julia Morgan was a pioneer throughout her professional life.  The first woman to enter and complete an education at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris, she later designed Hearst Castle, and left more than 700 buildings throughout California and the West.  Among other reasons, she is notable for having designed so many women-commissioned projects.  This exhibit is mounted in conjunction with the Landmarks California Commission's Julia Morgan 2012 celebration, and re-examines some of Julia Morgan's most influential designs, using material from the Environmental Design Archives, Visual Resources Collection, and Environmental Design Library.

, ,

SIX degrees

14-022-003.jpg

With more than 200 collections documenting the work of most of the San Francisco Bay Region’s historically significant architects and landscape architects, the holdings of the Environmental Design Archives are incredibly interconnected. Many of these connections stem from key figures or firms whose practice involved mentoring or collaborating with other regional architects and landscape architects.

This exhibition applies the theory of six degrees of separation to the designers whose collections are held by the Environmental Design Archives. Spanning 118 years, from the 1898 International Competition for the Phoebe Hearst Architectural Plan for the University of California to the present, SIX degrees showcases projects resulting from both personal and professional relationships.

, ,